Term Deposit Finder™ – Compare Term Deposit Accounts

Posted November 2nd, 2009 and last modified January 1st, 2014

A term deposit is also often known as a fixed savings account because the interest rate you earn is fixed, and so is the account balance - you can't put any more money in, or take any out until the end of the term you have chosen. A term deposit is just one way you can save for your future or for a specific goal, and here, we can help you decide whether a fixed term deposit account could be right for all or even just a part of your financial plans. .

Term Deposit Rates Comparison

3 Months p.a. 4 Months p.a. 6 Months p.a. 12 Months p.a. 24 Months p.a. 36 Months p.a. 60 Months p.a. Min Deposit
RaboDirect Term Deposit
RaboDirect Term Deposit
3.50% 3.55% 3.65% 4.00% 4.10% 4.60% $1,000 OpenMore
Bankwest Online Term Deposit
Bankwest Online Term Deposit
3.60% 3.00% 3.00% 3.70% 3.85% 4.10% 4.50% $1,000 OpenMore
Westpac Term Deposit
Westpac Term Deposit
3.15% 2.50% 2.50% 3.30% 3.60% 4.00% 4.55% $5,000 OpenMore
St.George Term Deposit
St.George Term Deposit
2.90% 3.25% 3.25% 3.35% 3.90% 4.05% 4.55% $1,000 OpenMore
You may also be interested in a high interest savings account.
Maximum Variable Rate p.a. Standard Variable Rate p.a. Bonus Interest p.a. Fees Min Bal / Min Deposit
RaboDirect High Interest Savings Account
RaboDirect High Interest Savings Account
Earn a high interest rate of 4.30% p.a. for 4. Plus enjoy a great ongoing rate of 3.20% p.a. 4.30% 3.20% 1.10% $0 $0 / $0 OpenMore
Bankwest TeleNet Saver
Bankwest TeleNet Saver
No Fees. No minimum monthly deposit. For balance up to $5,000,000. Earn a high 4.30% p.a. variable rate for 6 months. 4.30% 2.70% 1.60% $0 $0 / $1 OpenMore

There are only a few types of investments that can be considered as stable and the term deposit is one category of these. For investors that are more interested in long term money, it is a good means to achieve their goal. They know how much they put in, the interest rate, the time when they receive the money and how much they will receive. There are various interest rates that are available with the different terms but they are considered one of the best* and safest ways to invest and grow money.

This being said, for someone who wants to withdraw the money early, there are penalties and again, these change with the banking or financial institute. It can take away a part of all of the interest earned on that account. It is essential that when a person invests their money in term deposits that they understand all of the terms and conditions that go along with them and go with the ones with the least amount of penalties for the highest amount of interest.

Other Term Deposit Resources

  • Bank Term Deposit
    View the market-leading term deposit accounts on offer from Australia's top banks. Discover the benefits of opening a term deposit account with a bank.
  • Term Deposit Rates
    Compare interest rates on the top term deposit accounts on the Australian market. Secure the most competitive rate and reach your savings goals faster.
  • Fixed Term Deposit
    Discover the benefits of a fixed term deposit account as your money is kept secured and you are not tempted to make withdrawals.

Consider whether these features appeal to your needs:

  • The ability to choose a term anywhere between one month and five years, to meet your short, medium or long term savings goals.
  • Term deposits can require a small minimum deposit amount, often around $1,000.
  • They are completely managed for you so you don't have to have any specialist financial or investment experience.
  • Your interest rate, your investment amount and your returns are all guaranteed so you don't have to worry about movements in the share market, the official interest rate or the property bubble.

There are some options around what happens with regards to interest repayments. You can have your interest paid out daily from start until maturity or you can have the interest reinvested. Reinvesting can help to increase the size of your nest egg quickly. You can also diversify your term deposits, and have them across a variety of rates and maturity time lines.

Don't forget to leave enough money accessible if your regular savings account to account for any unforeseen expenditures you may have, such as vehicle repairs or emergencies, and you should be pretty well set. If you have a little extra cash stashed away, then a term deposit may be the perfect way to invest. These accounts are no risk and relatively high interest.

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What Do You Mean By A Fixed Rate?

If you're waiting for a catch you're not alone, and you're right to be wary when it comes to your finances, however, in this instance a fixed interest rate really does mean fixed.

Most high interest savings accounts and transaction accounts which pay interest have a variable interest rate. This means that the rate is set by the provider, but they are able to change it whenever they choose, in line with the movements of the Reserve Bank on official rates, or to reward customers when the bank has made a profit, or reduce the rate to cover losses. While it is possible to watch the standard variable rates of the major high interest savings account providers to follow the account with the highest interest rates, if you're looking for an easier solution to securing a high rate, fix it.

A fixed interest rate on a term deposit account will be calculated based on the term you have chosen, the amount you are investing and how you choose to have your interest paid: quarterly, six monthly, annually or at maturity. The provider will then calculate the best rate for your options, and guarantee your savings will earn that rate every single day for your entire term. Your returns are therefore guaranteed too.

However, a fixed interest rate will only remain fixed if you do not access your account during the term. If you need to make a withdrawal you will jeopardise your interest earnings, plus you can't add to your account balance until maturity.

You also need to make sure you are happy with the interest rate you have fixed, because during the term, your provider may raise their interest rate in response to economic movements, and you have to be content in the knowledge you are also protected from drops in the rate. At the same time, there are plenty of providers who are willing to offer very competitive rates because they want to add your savings to their reserves, to save them having to borrow from the still shaky global markets.

Learn more about fixed rate term deposits

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To help you decide if a term deposit is for you, follow these steps:

Title
  1. Clarify your savings goals.
    This will not only help you determine whether a term deposit is the right investment for you, but will also help you decide on a term and a deposit which is right too. For example, if you only have a small investment amount, but you need that amount to grow significantly to help you prepare for the arrival of a new baby, or to help you save for a house deposit, then you may choose to look at longer terms for your term deposit account, as a longer term will offer you a higher interest rate and better returns. Alternatively, if you've just about met your savings goal for a new car or TV, you may want to lock away your savings for just a few months so they can continue to earn interest, but you're not tempted to spend them.
  2. Be realistic about the term of your investment.
    Only you know what your finances are like, and if you need confirmation of the best investment style* you may want to consult a financial advisor or accountant, and you will know whether you need your savings in an emergency fund you can access. Using a term deposit account as an emergency fund can work well, if you know what your emergencies are likely to be; for example in November you could lock away some savings for just a few months so they don't get spent in the Christmas chaos, but are there when you have those endless back to school expenses which can quickly turn into emergencies.
  3. If you don't want to risk your investment, use a term deposit account.
    Shares and property can secure you high returns on your investments, but they can just as easily cost you more than you've invested too, and there are no guarantees. With a term deposit account you know how long your money is invested for, at what interest rate, and what your expected return at the end of the term will be, all before the first day of your term has elapsed.

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How To Compare Term Deposit Accounts

Most Australian financial institutions will offer a form of term deposit account, many will even offer more than one type of term deposit, that is how varied the product can be. That is also why you need to know what you are looking for in your comparisons, to ensure that you make your comparisons as easy as possible, and you track down the account which is right for you.

To compare term deposit accounts:

  • Decide on your term and then compare term deposits.
    Some financial institutions want to attract long term term deposits, and others prefer to facilitate short term investments. Therefore, before you choose a term deposit, you need to choose your term as one financial institution may offer 4.50% on a six month investment, where another will offer you 5.50% for that same term.
  • Compare based on your investment amount.
    This will allow you to make comparisons on a level playing field because many term deposit providers will tier their interest rates based on the deposit amount. Therefore a six month term deposit of $5,000 may earn 4.50% while a six month investment of $20,000 may earn 5.50% and you can save a lot of time in your comparisons by comparing based on what you can afford to invest.
  • Find out about fees.
    You don't want to plan for a big return on your term deposit investment only to find that there are monthly fees, fees to open the account or fees at the end of the term, it is possible to find a term deposit account without any of these fees so it is worth making the comparisons. While you are comparing term deposit account fees, also find out what you are charged to leave the term early, if an emergency does arise and you need access to your funds sooner than expected, some financial institutions will charge you a percentage of the investment, where others will have a set cancellation fee.
  • Save time as you save money by choosing an online term deposit account.
    Saving and investing your funds is something you have to do amongst all of your other commitments and if setting up and managing a term deposit account costs you time, is it really worth the returns? Instead choose an online term deposit account which can be opened online, where the statements can be viewed online or emailed to you and you can reinvest or cancel your investment through internet banking.


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  • Term Deposit Laddering Strategy Explained [Infographic]

    What is the TD Laddering Strategy The Term Deposit Ladder is an investment strategy whereby the investment is broken down into multiple long-term TDs to take advantage of the higher rates. Why TD Ladder Higher interest return Ability to pick the highest TD rate for each deposit portfolio Safer investment through diversification Access to matured [...]

  • How To Choose The Best Deposit Account

    Banks will use a variety of ways to get you in their doors, and some of these can be very deceptive. You want to look out for practices such as introductory rates or minimum balances. For all the information, read on to see what to look out for.

  • Should You Avoid Term Deposits?

    Term deposits are a secure and easy to manage way to invest savings, regardless of the returns being relatively lower than other forms of investments. Why shouldn’t I get a term deposit account? Term deposits involve fixing an interest rate to apply for a period of time on your investment. Interest rates are at an [...]

  • Investing With Term Deposits – Know The Benefits!

    Term deposits are a great investment strategy if you’ve got decent income and you need to sock some money away for a set period of time. You can’t lose money, you’re guaranteed a certain interest rate, and you won’t be able to spend it for the term of the deposit. It’s a great way to save, especially for those who tend to dip into their savings. Learn how…



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51 Responses to Term Deposit Finder™ – Compare Term Deposit Accounts

  1. Default Gravatar
    sal | April 23, 2014

    how interest would l earn on $20000 over a year?

    • Staff
      Shirley | April 23, 2014

      Hi Sal,

      Thanks for your question.

      This will depend on which term deposit you choose. You can then use our term deposit calculator to help you determine how much interest you’ll receive.

      Cheers,
      Shirley

  2. Default Gravatar
    mel | January 22, 2014

    i would like advice on investing 500,000. I want to be able to keep principle amount and use the interest to live on. thanks

    • Staff
      Shirley | January 22, 2014

      Hi Mel,

      Thanks for your comment.

      Please be mindful that we can only give general advice and not personalised advice. You may want to have a look at our high interest savings accounts because you’re paid interest monthly and so may be easier to live on. They also have more flexibility.

      Alternatively there are also term deposits which generally have a higher interest rate, but they are less flexible as you lock your money away for a certain period and there are penalties if you’d like to access your money early.

      Cheers,
      Shirley

  3. Default Gravatar
    david | January 16, 2014

    i have $300,000 in short term deposit that returns me $1,650 .00 per month was considering managed funds but as this is all the money i have are very unsure the risk is not good. if i was to put in my super fund that i only have $60,000 would be taxed so much. as i do not work any more this is my only income since my accident from work. i am not allowed the benefit due to my household income as well as have to much in saving was told by centrelink i must use up all my funds before they will pay me benefit .?.

    • Staff
      Shirley | January 17, 2014

      Hi David,

      Thanks for your comment.

      Generally to receive some sort of Government Benefit you need to pass some kind of asset and income test. This is probably what Centrelink was referring to.

      Cheers,
      Shirley

  4. Default Gravatar
    Dee | January 5, 2014

    Hi,
    I have $100,000.00 to put into a 7-9mth term deposit. BUT I am getting confused. Can you please help?
    Are you able to recommend a term deposit with a good interest rate, that calculates interest daily. It doesn’t matter if it just pays it on maturity.
    I will use this money at maturity to put towards a house deposit.
    I have been told about some term deposits that offer a bonus interest at maturity if no withdrawals and if you use for a house, is this true? I couldn’t find anything on that.
    Is there anything else major I should be aware of?
    Thanks in advance :)

    • Staff
      Shirley | January 6, 2014

      Hi Dee,

      Thanks for your comment.

      You may be getting a term deposit confused with a high interest savings account – there are some high interest savings accounts that offer a bonus interest with conditions, or could be referring to the First Home Saver Account.

      While we can’t recommend one specific product, you can sort through our term deposits by their interest rate by clicking the arrows in the blue table above. This article can also help you with your decision.

      Please let us know if you have anymore questions.

      Cheers,
      Shirley

  5. Default Gravatar
    Nish | December 30, 2013

    Good day, i looking to invest $30000 for 9 months, what will be most suitable; online saver accounts or term deposit ?
    Surely, high interest rate is preferable. Pls suggest. Thanks.

    • Staff
      Marc | January 3, 2014

      Hello Nish,
      thanks for the question.

      Unfortunately I cannot suggest one product over the other. Carry out some research on both types of products, and decide on a product which is right for you. Generally speaking, term deposits are not useful to those looking to get access to their money regularly or those who like to move their investments around at regular stages throughout the year. Online savings accounts are more flexible, but may not appeal to those who like to remove the temptation of accessing funds by locking it away in a term deposit.

      I hope this helps,
      Marc.

  6. Default Gravatar
    david | October 12, 2013

    i had a small pay out from my past employer from my work 8 years with no income not even able to get government benefits need money to recover live off my invest $230,000 ONLY GET 4.30 % over 5 years fixed

    • Staff
      Marc | October 14, 2013

      Hello David,
      thanks for the comment.

      Would you mind clarifying your question? I’d be glad to help you with any questions relating to term deposits or savings accounts more generally.

      Cheers,
      Marc.

    • Default Gravatar
      david | January 16, 2014

      need income to live of but interest rate only at present in 3% get $1,500 monthly but NO WORK.

      not able to get centre link payments till i spend all my money in my account. as was told max amount is $150,000 dave.

  7. Default Gravatar
    puzzled | September 7, 2013

    For 1 month TD accounts…..

    When is the interest paid out….maturity(i.e. 30 days)? The reason i ask is that i see various websites display rates but under the legend it says annual rate(or something to that affect). This is usually mixed in with 3,6,12,36,60 month TD rates too, so that might be part of the confusion too.

    Is interest compounded every day or is the rate calculated based on the 30 day period for the 1 month TD?

    What would the cumulative APY for 12 months of 1 month TD’s @ 4.5%? Is that still 4.5% broken divided over a period of 12 months, or 12 x 4.5% for the year?

    • Staff
      Shirley | September 7, 2013

      Hi Puzzled,

      Thanks for your comment.

      The interest is paid out on the date of maturity and is calculated based on the 1 month period.

      In the example you’ve described above, it would be the 4.5% broken down over a period of 12 months. I’ve also emailed you a pdf explaining this.

      Hope this helps,
      Shirley

  8. Default Gravatar
    jennifer | August 29, 2013

    I would like the best interest rate for my super which I would like to put on term deposit for 4 months $1.4 million. Maturing at the moment on 3rd September. Thank you.

    • Staff
      Jacob | August 29, 2013

      Hi Jennifer.

      Thanks for getting in touch with us about your question about term deposits.

      The page you’re on has a comparison of term deposit accounts. If you’re looking to collect the funds on the third of September, you may want to consider a high interest savings account instead. The minimum term for a term deposit is one month.

      The main difference between a term deposit and a high interest savings account (HISA) is that with a HISA you’re not locked in for a specific term. They offer comparable rates of interest with the opportunity to earn bonus interest for a promotional introductory period or if you meet certain conditions (deposit over a certain amount and make no withdrawals, for instance).

      You can use the product table to order HISA’s by a number of factors (bonus interest, base interest rate etc.) click on the heading at the top of the table to do this. If you’re looking for a direct comparison between accounts, you can use the check boxes on the left hand side of the table and then click compare.

      Please let us know if you require more information.

      Thanks for the question and I hope this helps.

      Jacob.

  9. Default Gravatar
    jane | August 15, 2013

    I’m a british citizen who is resident in spain. Can I take out a fixed term deposit in australian dollars ? it would be an amount of 50,000 pounds .

    • Staff
      Shirley | August 16, 2013

      Hi Jane,

      Thanks for your comment.

      Unfortunately, to be eligible for our featured term deposits, you need to be an Australian permanent resident.

      Cheers,
      Shirley

  10. Default Gravatar
    Dimples | August 1, 2013

    We are senior pensioner couple who do not pay tax as we are on age pension. Whenever our term deposit comes due for renewal I know I can get a higher rate somewhere else but they want a tax file number. How do I get around that please?

    • Staff
      Shirley | August 1, 2013

      Hi Dimples,

      Thanks for your question.

      Usually you can open term deposits without a TFN, but the financial institution is obliged by law to withhold an amount from any interest paid or credited you to satisfy the expected tax liability. Currently, the withholding tax rate is 46.5% for those who do not provide their TFN.

      Please let me know if you’re having trouble finding a financial institution that doesn’t require a TFN.

      Hope this helps,
      Shirley

    • Default Gravatar
      Margaret | August 11, 2013

      Which term deposits can pay a monthly income off the investment or do I need to use a savings account?

    • Staff
      Shirley | August 12, 2013

      Hi Margaret,

      Thanks for your comment.

      There are some 1-month term deposits available, but they may not give the same returns as high interest saving accounts.

      It would be a good idea to crunch some numbers into our savings goal calculator to help you determine what’s best for your financial situation.

      Cheers,
      Shirley

  11. Default Gravatar
    pablo | July 27, 2013

    hi am pretty blond with rates and all that…. y question is if I put 5 grands on term deposit for a year with WestPac how much profit will I make (how much money) and same question if I put 2 grand for a year on term deposit with George bank how much will I get. thank you very much indeed

  12. Default Gravatar
    Ollie | June 26, 2013

    what is the term deposit rate for U Bank.

    • Staff
      Shirley | June 27, 2013

      Hi Ollie,

      Thanks for your comment.

      I’ve sent you an email about your request.

      Cheers,
      Shirley

  13. Default Gravatar
    stan | May 24, 2013

    What is a bonus interest rate and how do I qualify?

    • Staff
      Marc | May 27, 2013

      Hello Stan,
      thanks for the question!

      There are different types of bonus interest rates for different products. Some products will give the bonus interest rate to any new customers for a certain period of time, such as six months. Other products will grant you bonus interest as long as you follow certain conditions, such as making no withdrawals each month or a certain amount in deposits. The qualifications will be listed with the product, so have a good read of any products you’re interested in.

      Cheers,
      Marc.

  14. Default Gravatar
    Monica | May 13, 2013

    I have One million dollars, what is the best way to get the highest interest in 12 months,
    Cheers Monica

    • Staff
      Shirley | May 14, 2013

      Hi Monica,

      Thanks for your comment.

      You may want to compare our term deposits and choose the highest interest rate.

      Cheers,
      Shirley

  15. Default Gravatar
    CUONG | May 2, 2013

    Would you like to explain what expenses are in opening a term deposit to me?

    • Staff
      Shirley | May 3, 2013

      Hi Cuong,

      Thanks for your comment.

      The majority of term deposits require no fees to open which highlights the importance of comparing so you make the most informed decision. However most term deposits require a minimum amount to open.

      Hope this helps,
      Shirley

  16. Default Gravatar
    Wyn | April 10, 2013

    Who is Rabo bank? How safe is my money in these places

  17. Default Gravatar
    karen | April 4, 2013

    i have $20000 aus and i am looking at a term deposit acc which is going to get the best return over 3 or 6 mths

  18. Default Gravatar
    GUY | March 28, 2013

    I have $6,000.00. Which financial business has the best plan on offer?
    Thank you

    • Staff
      Adrian | March 28, 2013

      Hi,

      Many customers just look for the highest interest rate that they are eligible for. Many also look to an ongoing rate so they don’t have to switch accounts or term deposits too often.

      It really depends on your needs and how often you want to switch savings accounts. You can view interest rates in the above comparison tables for savings accounts and term deposits.

      Cheers, Adrian

  19. Default Gravatar
    vic | March 19, 2013

    what is ING DIRECT?
    Are good for term deposit?
    and home loan?
    thanks

    • Staff
      Shirley | April 3, 2013

      Hi Vic,

      ING is Australia’s fifth largest bank, they are back by the Government Guarantee for their financial products.

      Cheers,
      Shirley

  20. Default Gravatar
    Sunya | March 14, 2013

    I am New Zealand Citizen, am I qualified for Bonus interest rate?

    • Staff
      Shirley | April 3, 2013

      Hi Sunya,

      A lot of our featured savings accounts are only available to Australian residents. It best to double check with the accounts you’re interested in to confirm if you’re eligible.

      Cheers,
      Shirley

  21. Default Gravatar
    Valerie | February 4, 2013

    Hi,
    I would like to lock 10000 in a long term deposit.
    Which of the major Banks would,you recommend
    Thank you

    • Staff
      Adrian | February 4, 2013

      Hi Valerie. I can’t recommend banks for you. If it were me, I’d be looking for a strong interest rate and decent levels of customer service. Sometimes customer service levels are high when you’re applying for an account, yet when you become a customer, the level of service drops. You might consider looking for banks who win awards for customer service or friends who are happy with their banking experience.

      Cheers, Adrian.

    • Default Gravatar
      Peter | March 21, 2013

      Why would anybody want to invest in Bank West ?
      I have been trying to open a term deposit account for my super fund for a considerable amount of money for over 4 weeks. The ineptitude of the Bank west staff is unbelievable. One would think I was trying to borrow money, not invest it.
      I have been patiently waiting and sending documents but today I finally spat the dummy.
      So folks, cross Bank West of your list. If it is this hard to give them my money, how will it be to get it back ?

  22. Default Gravatar
    yoav | January 31, 2013

    must i be australian to invest?
    i don’t have a tax id
    i am from israel

  23. Default Gravatar
    Diane | January 23, 2013

    I am currently changing a SMSF from a high earning portfolio to a conservative fund, as the fund has changed from an accumulation fund to a pension fund. Changing to a conservative pension funds, I had cashed in some of the funds share portfolio, and I am now looking as to where to “fairly” securely transfer these funds in order to obtain a safer and more stable growth. I am looking at Government Bonds, Term deposits and some liquid cash into savings. Perhaps you can advise in this situation. Thank you

    • Staff
      Adrian | January 24, 2013

      Hi Diane. I’m not in a position to give you personal advice. But I can give you the same information I gave Sharlene:

      One thing worth considering is splitting up your term deposit between two institutions, as to qualify for the government guarantee on deposits of $250,000 per person, per institution. APRA has a list of the institutions that are covered by the Financial Claims Scheme.

      One thing to remember with this is that, under the scheme:
      - Bankwest is the same institution as CBA
      - RAMS is the same institution as Westpac
      - Virgin is the same institution as Citibank
      - UBank is the same institution as NAB

      So, if you had deposits with Bankwest and CBA, the sum of them is covered for a total of $250,000 and not $500,000.

      Another piece of information you may find worth reviewing is our page on Term Deposit Laddering.

      Also, please note that term deposits compound interest yearly whereas online savings accounts compound interest monthly, which can obviously impact returns.

      I hope this helps, Adrian.

  24. Default Gravatar
    sharlene | January 23, 2013

    I have $490,000 what is the best way to get the highest interest i would like to make it 500,000 in six months .

    • Staff
      Adrian | January 24, 2013

      Hi Sharlene. Sorry for the delay in my reply.

      According to my back-of-the-envelope calculations, you could make your target of $10,000 in interest in 6 months with an interest rate of 4.1%.

      One consideration worth considering is splitting up your term deposit between two institutions, as to qualify for the government guarantee on deposits of $250,000 per person, per institution. APRA has a list of the institutions that are covered by the Financial Claims Scheme.

      One thing to remember with this is that, under the scheme:
      - Bankwest is the same institution as CBA
      - RAMS is the same institution as Westpac
      - Virgin is the same institution as Citibank
      - UBank is the same institution as NAB

      So, if you had deposits with Bankwest and CBA, the sum of them is covered for a total of $250,000 and not $500,000.

      Another piece of information you may find worth reviewing is our page on Term Deposit Laddering.

      I hope this helps, Adrian.




Top High Interest Savings Accounts*

All of these accounts are FREE to open and require no minimum deposit. They all have easy internet banking access with no transaction fees.

Maximum Variable Rate p.a. Standard Variable Rate p.a. Bonus Interest p.a. Fees Min Bal / Min Deposit
RaboDirect High Interest Savings Account
RaboDirect High Interest Savings Account
A high introductory rate for 4 months, and a high ongoing variable rate. 4.30% 3.20% 1.10% $0 $0 / $0 OpenMore
ME Bank Online Savings Account
ME Bank Online Savings Account
Earn 4.60% p.a. for 5 months on balances up to $250,000 when linked to a ME Bank Transaction Account. Plus no monthly account keeping fees. 4.60% 2.90% 1.70% $0 $0 / $0 OpenMore
Bankwest TeleNet Saver
Bankwest TeleNet Saver
No Fees. No minimum monthly deposit. For balances up to $5,000,000. Earn a high 4.30% p.a. variable rate for 6 months. 4.30% 2.70% 1.60% $0 $0 / $1 OpenMore
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